Which Wine To Pair With Lasagna?

Lasagna is a firm favourite in many households. You can amend the classic recipe to suit various dietary requirements, and always end up with a very tasty and satisfying dish.

But which wine should you pair with your lasagna? We have provided a selection of red and white wines to serve alongside this classic dish. 

Which Wine To Pair With Lasagna

What Is Lasagna? 

Lasagna is actually a type of pasta that comes in wide, flat sheets. The term lasagna also refers to an Italian dish. The pasta sheets are layered with fillings, traditionally a meat ragu, and topped with a white sauce and cheese.

The whole dish is then baked in the oven. You can use whatever filling you like for your lasagna. Spinach and ricotta is a very popular vegetarian alternative, layered with tomato sauce.

You can also make the lasagna dairy free by switching out the creamy white sauce, or you can use gluten free pasta to suit a celiac diet. 

A fruity, acidic red wine with low tannin is probably the best choice. The acidity will go well with the tomato sauce, and is even more important in a red meat lasagne.

The strong fruity notes will stand up to the hearty flavour of the dish. The bitterness of the tannin would not be a great match with the tartness of the tomatoes. 

Best Wine Pairing For A Meaty Lasagna? 

Pinot Noir is a light bodied red wine with fruity notes of cherries and strawberries. It can handle being paired with a flavoursome dish as it has an earthy quality, whilst the refreshing fruit will compliment the tomato. It has enough acidity to be a good match with this dish. 

Another great option is a bold Zinfandel. It is fruity yet smoky, which will really lift the beef flavours in the lasagna. It is quite heavy in the mouth and can cut through the fattiness of the meat, especially if you couldn’t get hold of lean mince for the ragu. 

Chianti Classico is a very famous red wine produced in Italy that pairs well with many Italian dishes. The tart flavours of red and black cherry will contrast well with the rich, sweet tomato.

Earthy, herbal notes add a welcome lift, whilst the acidity will cleanse your palate in between mouthfuls. 

If you are looking for a white wine pairing to go with your lasagna, then focus on providing a contrasting flavour rather than complimenting the ingredients that are already in the dish.

A crisp, light bodied pinot grigio would work well. The delicate flavours of peach, pear and apple will counterbalance the richness of the tomato sauce. It is an acidic, dry wine which will cut through the strong flavours.

Avoid sweet white wines, as the meal is already sweet enough with the tomato sauce. 

Best Wine Pairing For A Vegetarian Lasagna? 

Oak aged wines tend to pair well with creamy sauces as they have a fuller body, with sweet vanilla notes and a spicy element.

A buttery chardonnay would make a great pairing with a creamy vegetarian lasagna, packed with mushrooms and ricotta, but it won’t go well with a tomato sauce.

A pumpkin and sage lasagna would go wonderfully with a light bodied pinot grigio, whereas a zucchini and garlic combination would pair perfectly with a rolle.

Onion and eggplant in a tomato sauce is a tasty meat alternative, and could be served with a grenache that has soft tannins. A sweet potato and spinach lasagna would be complimented by a hearty merlot. 

Barbera deserves a special mention for vegetarian lasagna. It is a medium bodied, acidic red wine with notes of cherry, blackberry, liquorice and back pepper with a herby aroma.

It is a great wine to serve with Mediterranean food, as it pairs well with tomato based sauces, roasted vegetables, creamy white sauces and aged cheese. Quinoa is a popular meat replacement. You could try serving this wine alongside a quinoa and roasted squash lasagna.

Sangiovese is another excellent choice of red wine for vegetarian lasagnas, especially those with spinach and mushrooms as key ingredients. It is a medium to full bodied tannic wine with notes of cherry, roasted tomato, oregano, espresso and sweet balsamic.

It pairs well with tomato based sauces, roasted peppers, and many pasta dishes including lasagna. The acidity of this wine can stand up to rich tomato sauces and creamy white sauces. 

Something A Little Different? 

If a standard red or white isn’t what you fancy, you could try a sparkling wine like prosecco. The refreshing, crisp flavours will cut through the richness of the dish whilst the bubbles will cleanse your palate between mouthfuls.

You could also serve a dry rose, to cut through the indulgent cheese and thick pasta. Both of these options offer a dry alternative to the classic red and white pairing. 

Emma Miller
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